Mar 24 – 25, 2022
Europe/Paris timezone

Lifetime measurements in the sub-picosecond regime with the pγ-coincidence Doppler-shift attenuation method

Mar 24, 2022, 11:00 AM
30m

Speaker

Ms Sarah Prill (University of Cologne, Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cologne, Germany)

Description

Nuclear level lifetimes are important properties of the atomic nucleus, as they yield information about transition strengths and nuclear wave functions. An established method to determine lifetimes in the sub-picosecond regime is the particle-γ coincidence Doppler-shift attenuation method (pγ-DSAM) [1]. As opposed to most DSAM approaches, the additional coincident detection of emitted γ-ray and scattered projectile allows the selection of excited states, thus eliminating feeding contributions. The coincidence data is obtained with the SONIC@HORUS detector array [2] situated at the 10 MV FN tandem accelerator in Cologne. It consists of 12 silicon particle detectors and 14 high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors for the detection of γ-rays. With this method and setup, lifetimes of several dozens of nuclear levels can be determined in a single experiment.
Lately, the DSA method has been used to determine lifetimes of excited low-spin states of nuclei in the mass region of A ≈ 100 and above. Recent results on Ru, Sn [3] and Te [4] isotopes will be presented in this contribution.
Supported by the DFG (ZI-510/9-1).

[1] A. Hennig et al., NIM A 794, 171 (2015).
[2] S.G. Pickstone et al., NIM A 875, 104 (2017).
[3] M. Spieker et al., Phys. Rev. C 97, 054319 (2018).
[4] S. Prill et al., accepted at Phys. Rev. C

Primary author

Ms Sarah Prill (University of Cologne, Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cologne, Germany)

Co-authors

Ms Anna Bohn (University of Cologne, Institute for Nuclear Physics, Germany) Ms Christina Deke (University of Cologne, Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cologne, Germany) Mr Felix Heim (University of Cologne, Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cologne, Germany) Mr Michael Weinert (University of Cologne, Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cologne, Germany) Prof. Andreas Zilges (University of Cologne, Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cologne, Germany)

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